Republicans Plan Pension Raid, Again

Economics, Education, Kentucky, Politics

If you are not paying attention, let me catch you up. Since 2009, the KY State Senate and House have been raiding the State Employee Insurance fund each year to offset the underfunding of state budgets. In this year’s budget Governor Matt Bevin proposed a $200m raid, but today the House ($400m) and Senate ($300m) both propose their own taking of money paid by workers into the fund. By decreasing the state employee insurance, they are shifting the out-of-pocket burden on to a smaller group and thus reducing the economic impact of those 250,000 workers. Neo-Cons preach trickle down econ but reducing the take-home pay of state workers is actually the opposite of that by taking spendable money out of the families lives. Additionally, if it costs more to receive medical care, people are less likely to go out and get the medical care. This feeds into reduced efficiency in the workplace and the higher chance of teachers, first responders, desk clerks, etc showing up sick to work.

If you still do not understand how they can refuse to reassess the tax revenues streams of the state while reducing the take-home pay of over 6% of the state population, I think this is the plan. By creating a more dramatic raid on the system from the House or Senate, the plan from Gov. Biven seems more accessible. These other two plans can also be used as bargaining chips to force SB1 “reforms” that haven’t been supported by KEA or JCEA. We saw last week that Republican leadership was willing to hold up passage of an HB for families of fallen officers to move FOP against workers not supporting SB1.

http://www.kentucky.com/news/politics-government/article206242814.html

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CW 150: Secession, Timing, and Purpose

Civil War, History
Flag of Virginia

Image via Wikipedia

During the time following the attack on Ft. Sumter but before the Battle of Bull Run, the country held its breath and began to find out what secession really means. No one was truly surprised when Firebrands in GA and SC began to push the slave holding aristocracy towards secession in the Deep South. Lincoln could see that the regional disillusionment of the Union was just that, regional. However his next move would be the tipping point between a wider more consuming war or simply a militia driven attack on the aristocrats.

Lincoln’s action of calling for militias to give their allegiance to the Federal government and then march through other states to attack major cities in the South, Charleston, Atlanta, and Birmingham, was a radical idea but not unheard-of. Additionally, the comments of Alexnder Stephens explaining GA secession as, “the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery—subordination to the superior race—is his natural and normal condition,” show that for many the war was about SlaveryAristocracy, and maybe State’s Rights. Thus, the actions of border states in April and May of 1861 appear just as radical as Lincoln asking the common man to fight the Slave holding Aristocracy of the the Deep South. If I were a Virginian at this moment in history, I would have been terrified knowing that the armies of the Federal Government, amassing within the federal district, would be marching through my towns and down my roads to attack “The South.”